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Breakthrough could enable cheaper infrared cameras

Photos taken by researchers testing a new method to make an infrared camera that could be much less expensive to manufacture. Credit: Photo courtesy of Xin Tang There's an entire world our eyes miss, hidden in the ranges of light wavelengths that human eyes can't see. But infrared cameras can pick up the secret light…

Listening to quantum radio

This quantum chip (1x1 cm big) allows the researchers to listen to the smallest radio signal allowed by quantum mechanics. Credit: TU Delft Researchers at Delft University of Technology have created a quantum circuit that enables them to listen to the weakest radio signal allowed by quantum mechanics. This new quantum circuit opens the door…

The moiré patterns of three layers change the electronic properties of...

A graphene layer (black) of hexagonally arranged carbon atoms is placed between two layers of boron nitride atoms, which are also arranged hexagonally with a slightly different size. The overlap creates honeycomb patterns in various sizes. Credit: Swiss Nanoscience Institute, University of Basel Combining an atomically thin graphene and a boron nitride layer at a…

Can entangled qubits be used to probe black holes?

This is a schematic of the black hole information paradox. Alice drops a qubit into a black hole and asks whether Bob can reconstruct the qubit using only the outgoing Hawking radiation. Credit: Norman Yao, UC Berkeley Physicists have used a seven-qubit quantum computer to simulate the scrambling of information inside a black hole, heralding…

Scientists levitate particles with sound to find out how they cluster...

University of Chicago and the University of Bath scientists revealed new insights about how materials cluster together in the absence of gravity. Credit: Melody Lim Scientists from the University of Chicago and the University of Bath used sound waves to levitate particles, revealing new insights about how materials cluster together in the absence of gravity…

Elegant interplay of coloration strategies is discovered in squid’s smart skin

This is a close up of iridescent reflectance from expanded yellow, red and brown squid chromatophores. Excised mantle skin, hyaline layer removed. Oblique illumination, dissecting microscope. Credit: Steve Senft (Hanlon Lab, Marine Biological Laboratory) In the blink of an eye, the squid's "smart skin" switches color and pattern for the purpose of camouflage or sexual…

Step right up for bigger 2D sheets

Rice University researchers determined complementarity between growing hexagonal boron nitride crystals and a stepped substrate mimics the complementarity found in strands of DNA. The Rice theory supports experiments that have produced large, oriented wafers. Credit: Ksenia Bets/Rice University Very small steps make a big difference to researchers who want to create large wafers of two-dimensional…

Engineered microbe may be key to producing plastic from plants

University of Wisconsin-Madison postdoctoral researcher Alex Linz examines a plate streaked with N. aromaticivorans (in yellow), a soil bacterium that could turn a renewable source -- lignin from plant cells -- into a replacement for petroleum-based plastics. Credit: Photo by Chelsea Mamott, GLBRC With a few genetic tweaks, a type of soil bacteria with an…

Spectroscopy on individual molecules

Professor Dr. Juergen Hauer (left) and first author Erling Thyrhaug with their measuring instrument. In the background, spectra taken with it. Credit: Andreas Battenberg While spectroscopic measurements are normally averaged over myriad molecules, a new method developed by researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) provides precise information about the interaction of individual molecules…

‘Meta-mirror’ reflects sound waves in any direction

The 'meta-mirror' was carefully engineered to make a sound wave coming straight at it reflect at a different angle with zero scattering losses. Credit: Steve Cummer, Duke University Researchers at Duke University and Aalto University (Finland) have constructed a "meta-mirror" device capable of perfectly reflecting sound waves in any direction. The proof-of-principle demonstration is analogous…

What causes that peak? Answering a long-standing question for covalent liquids

X-ray scattering (white beem) image of local tetrahedral ordering formed by Si atoms (large yellow particles) in liquid silica (Si atoms are large particles and O atoms are small particles) by simulation. Credit: 2019 Hajime Tanaka, Institute of Industrial Science, The University of Tokyo Materials that have a disordered structure with no regular repeating pattern…

New reactor-liner alloy material offers strength, resilience

This is Osman El Atwani (left) and Enrique Martinez at the transmission electron microscope. Credit: Los Alamos National Laboratory A new tungsten-based alloy developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory can withstand unprecedented amounts of radiation without damage. Essential for extreme irradiation environments such as the interiors of magnetic fusion reactors, previously explored materials have thus…

New hurdle cleared in race toward quantum computing

The findings could pave the way for development of topological qubits. Credit: Purdue University/James Nakamura Qubits, the units used to encode information in quantum computing, are not all created equal. Some researchers believe that topological qubits, which are tougher and less susceptible to environmental noise than other kinds, may be the best medium for pushing…

Now you see heat, now you don’t

A hot object can be fully hidden from infrared detection by adding polyethylene glycol to an aerogel film. Credit: American Chemical Society Hiding an object from heat-sensing cameras could be useful for military and technology applications as well as for research. Efforts to develop such a method have been underway for decades with varying degrees…

In-depth insights into glass corrosion

Prof. Dr. Thorsten Geisler-Wierwille from the Institute for Geosciences and Meteorology at the Raman spectrometer with a built-in heating vessel. Credit: © Barbara Frommann/Uni Bonn Silicate glass has many applications, including the use as a nuclear waste form to immobilize radioactive elements from spent fuel. However, it has one disadvantage -- it corrodes when it…

Ultracold atoms could provide 2D window to exotic 1D physics

In an ultracold atomic experiment proposed by Rice University physicists Matthew Foster and Seth Davis, quantum fractionalization would be observed by density waves propagating in the direction of 1D quantum waveguides (left). In the absence of fractionalization (right), density waves would spread in a perpendicular direction. Credit: Matthew Foster/Rice University Rice University physicists Matthew Foster…

Nanotechnology makes it possible for mice to see in infrared

This graphical abstract shows how injectable photoreceptor-binding particles with the ability to convert photons from to high-energy forms allow mice to develop infrared vision without compromising their normal vision and associated behavioral responses. Credit: Ma et al./Current Biology Mice with vision enhanced by nanotechnology were able to see infrared light as well as visible light,…

Magnonic devices can replace electronics without much noise

This is a chip that generates a magnonic current, or spin wave, between transmitting and receiving antennae. Credit: Balandin Lab at UC Riverside Electronic devices such as transistors are getting smaller and will soon hit the limits of conventional performance based on electrical currents. Devices based on magnonic currents -- quasi-particles associated with waves of…

Finding keyholes in metals 3D printing

This image, taken under the synchrotron at Argonne National Laboratory, shows a keyhole void about to be formed during the metal 3D printing process. During laser powder bed fusion, a 3D printer 'drills' a hole into the metal. Credit: Carnegie Mellon University College of Engineering Additive manufacturing's promise to revolutionize industry is constrained by a…

‘Immunizing’ quantum bits so that they can grow up

A new material could 'immunize' topological quantum bits so that they are resilient enough for building a quantum computer. Credit: Purdue University image/Morteza Kayyalha Quantum computers will process significantly more information at once compared to today's computers. But the building blocks that contain this information -- quantum bits, or "qubits" -- are way too sensitive…

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