Monday, May 27, 2019
Home Tags Bioscience

Tag: bioscience

How corn’s ancient ancestor rejects crossbreeding

Corn varieties (stock image). Credit: © cpnjuansanchez / Adobe Stock Determining how one species becomes distinct from another has been a subject of fascination dating back to Charles Darwin. New research led by Carnegie's Matthew Evans and published in Nature Communications elucidates the mechanism that keeps maize distinct from its ancient ancestor grass, teosinte. Speciation…

Temperature alters developing nervous system in frogs, study shows

African clawed frog (stock image). Credit: © Brandy McKnight / Adobe Stock Can the environment affect how the spinal cord develops specialized circuitry, or is that process hardwired, following prescribed genetic instructions turned on early in the embryo? A UC Davis study that compared the effects of cold and warm temperatures on the development of…

The extraordinary powers of bacteria visualized in real time

Bacterial cell culture (stock image). Credit: © sinhyu / Adobe Stock The global spread of antibiotic resistance is a major public health issue and a priority for international microbiology research. In his paper to be published in the journal Science, Christian Lesterlin, Inserm researcher at Lyon's "Molecular Microbiology and Structural Biochemistry" laboratory (CNRS/Université Claude Bernard…

The extraordinary powers of bacteria visualized in real time

Bacterial cell culture (stock image). Credit: © sinhyu / Adobe Stock The global spread of antibiotic resistance is a major public health issue and a priority for international microbiology research. In his paper to be published in the journal Science, Christian Lesterlin, Inserm researcher at Lyon's "Molecular Microbiology and Structural Biochemistry" laboratory (CNRS/Université Claude Bernard…

Mites and ticks are close relatives, new research shows

Mite illustration. Credit: © peterschreiber.media / Adobe Stock Scientists from the University of Bristol and the Natural History Museum in London have reconstructed the evolutionary history of the chelicerates, the mega-diverse group of 110,000 arthropods that includes spiders, scorpions, mites and ticks. They found, for the first time, genomic evidence that mites and ticks do…

Plant stem cells require low oxygen levels

Arabidopsis (stock image). Credit: © Vasiliy Koval / Adobe Stock Plants function as the green lungs of our planet. Rightfully so, due to the capacity of a large single tree releasing more than 120 kg of oxygen into the Earth's atmosphere every year through a series of sunlight-fuelled reactions in photosynthesis. However during flood events,…

Penguins and their chicks’ responses to local fish numbers informs marine...

African penguins. Credit: © Nico Smit / Adobe Stock How adult penguins fish and the body condition of their chicks are directly linked to local fish abundance, and could potentially inform fishery management, a new study has found. The researchers studied an endangered African penguin colony during a rare three-year closure of commercial fisheries around…

Baby tiger sharks eat songbirds

Tiger shark. Credit: © frantisek hojdysz / Adobe Stock Tiger sharks have a reputation for being the "garbage cans of the sea" -- they'll eat just about anything, from dolphins and sea turtles to rubber tires. But before these top predators grow to their adult size of 15 feet, young tiger sharks have an even…

Synthetic biologists hack bacterial sensors

Bacteria illustrations (stock image). Credit: © pandawild / Adobe Stock Rice University synthetic biologists have hacked bacterial sensing with a plug-and-play system that could be used to mix-and-match tens of thousands of sensory inputs and genetic outputs. The technology has wide-ranging implications for medical diagnostics, the study of deadly pathogens, environmental monitoring and more. In…

Synthetic biologists hack bacterial sensors

Bacteria illustrations (stock image). Credit: © pandawild / Adobe Stock Rice University synthetic biologists have hacked bacterial sensing with a plug-and-play system that could be used to mix-and-match tens of thousands of sensory inputs and genetic outputs. The technology has wide-ranging implications for medical diagnostics, the study of deadly pathogens, environmental monitoring and more. In…

Anxiety might be alleviated by regulating gut bacteria

Gut microbes illustration. Credit: © nobeastsofierce / Adobe Stock People who experience anxiety symptoms might be helped by taking steps to regulate the microorganisms in their gut using probiotic and non-probiotic food and supplements, suggests a review of studies published today in the journal General Psychiatry. Anxiety symptoms are common in people with mental diseases…

How egg cells choose their best powerhouses to pass on

Mitochondria illustration. Credit: © Mopic / Adobe Stock Developing egg cells conduct tests to select the healthiest of their energy-making machines to be passed to the next generation. A new study in fruit flies, published online May 15 in Nature, shows how the testing is done. The work focuses on mitochondria, the cellular machines that…

Scientists find new type of cell that helps tadpoles’ tails regenerate

Tadpole. Credit: © Frank / Adobe Stock Researchers at the University of Cambridge have uncovered a specialised population of skin cells that coordinate tail regeneration in frogs. These 'Regeneration-Organizing Cells' help to explain one of the great mysteries of nature and may offer clues about how this ability might be achieved in mammalian tissues. It…

Researchers unravel mechanisms that control cell size

Dividing cells illustration. Credit: © Kateryna_Kon / Adobe Stock Working with bacteria, a multidisciplinary team at the University of California San Diego has provided new insight into a longstanding question in science: What are the underlying mechanisms that control the size of cells? Nearly five years ago a team led by Suckjoon Jun, a biophysicist…

Dangerous pathogens use this sophisticated machinery to infect hosts

Pathogens illustration (stock image). Credit: © beawolf / Adobe Stock Gastric cancer, Q fever, Legionnaires' disease, whooping cough -- though the infectious bacteria that cause these dangerous diseases are each different, they all utilize the same molecular machinery to infect human cells. Bacteria use this machinery, called a Type IV secretion system (T4SS), to inject…

Researchers unravel mechanisms that control cell size

Dividing cells illustration. Credit: © Kateryna_Kon / Adobe Stock Working with bacteria, a multidisciplinary team at the University of California San Diego has provided new insight into a longstanding question in science: What are the underlying mechanisms that control the size of cells? Nearly five years ago a team led by Suckjoon Jun, a biophysicist…

Dangerous pathogens use this sophisticated machinery to infect hosts

Pathogens illustration (stock image). Credit: © beawolf / Adobe Stock Gastric cancer, Q fever, Legionnaires' disease, whooping cough -- though the infectious bacteria that cause these dangerous diseases are each different, they all utilize the same molecular machinery to infect human cells. Bacteria use this machinery, called a Type IV secretion system (T4SS), to inject…

Scientists propose rethinking ‘endangered species’ definition to save slow-breeding giants

Elephants. Credit: © Chaiphorn / Adobe Stock Conservation decisions based on population counts may fail to protect large, slow-breeding animals from irrevocable decline, according to new research coinciding with Endangered Species Day. "Critical thresholds in so-called vital rates -- such as mortality and fertility rates among males and females of various ages -- can signal…

Bedbugs evolved more than 100 million years ago

Bedbug. Credit: © Tomasz / Adobe Stock Bedbugs -- some of the most unwanted human bed-mates -- have been parasitic companions with other species aside from humans for more than 100 million years, walking the earth at the same time as dinosaurs. Work by an international team of scientists, including the University of Sheffield, compared…

Jawless fish take a bite out of the blood-brain barrier

Lamprey mouth. Credit: © Gena / Adobe Stock A jawless parasitic fish could help lead the way to more effective treatments for multiple brain ailments, including cancer, trauma and stroke. One major challenge in treating cancers and other disorders of the brain is ensuring that medicines reach their targets. A team of biomedical engineers and…

Let's Connect

5,362FansLike
848FollowersFollow
1,652FollowersFollow
- Advertisement -

MOST POPULAR

NEW POSTS

- Advertisement -