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driverless-cars-working-together-can-speed-up-traffic-by-35

Driverless cars working together can speed up traffic by 35%

Autonomous cars concept. Credit: © folienfeuer / Adobe Stock A fleet of driverless cars working together to keep traffic moving smoothly can improve overall traffic flow by at least 35 percent, researchers have shown. The researchers, from the University of Cambridge, programmed a small fleet of miniature robotic cars to drive on a multi-lane track…
8216spider-like-senses8217-could-help-autonomous-machines-see-better

‘Spider-like senses’ could help autonomous machines see better

Drones in city concept (stock image). Credit: © ChenPG / Adobe Stock What if drones and self-driving cars had the tingling "spidey senses" of Spider-Man? They might actually detect and avoid objects better, says Andres Arrieta, an assistant professor of mechanical engineering at Purdue University, because they would process sensory information faster. Better sensing capabilities…
how-egg-cells-choose-their-best-powerhouses-to-pass-on

How egg cells choose their best powerhouses to pass on

Mitochondria illustration. Credit: © Mopic / Adobe Stock Developing egg cells conduct tests to select the healthiest of their energy-making machines to be passed to the next generation. A new study in fruit flies, published online May 15 in Nature, shows how the testing is done. The work focuses on mitochondria, the cellular machines that…
scientists-find-new-type-of-cell-that-helps-tadpoles8217-tails-regenerate

Scientists find new type of cell that helps tadpoles’ tails regenerate

Tadpole. Credit: © Frank / Adobe Stock Researchers at the University of Cambridge have uncovered a specialised population of skin cells that coordinate tail regeneration in frogs. These 'Regeneration-Organizing Cells' help to explain one of the great mysteries of nature and may offer clues about how this ability might be achieved in mammalian tissues. It…
researchers-unravel-mechanisms-that-control-cell-size

Researchers unravel mechanisms that control cell size

Dividing cells illustration. Credit: © Kateryna_Kon / Adobe Stock Working with bacteria, a multidisciplinary team at the University of California San Diego has provided new insight into a longstanding question in science: What are the underlying mechanisms that control the size of cells? Nearly five years ago a team led by Suckjoon Jun, a biophysicist…

Researchers unravel mechanisms that control cell size

Dividing cells illustration. Credit: © Kateryna_Kon / Adobe Stock Working with bacteria, a multidisciplinary team at the University of California San Diego has provided new insight into a longstanding question in science: What are the underlying mechanisms that control the size of cells? Nearly five years ago a team led by Suckjoon Jun, a biophysicist…
scientists-capture-first-ever-video-of-body8217s-safety-test-for-t-cells

Scientists capture first-ever video of body’s safety test for T-cells

T cell illustration (stock image). Credit: © sveta / Adobe Stock For the first time, immunologists from The University of Texas at Austin have captured on video what happens when T-cells -- the contract killers of the immune system, responsible for wiping out bacteria and viruses -- undergo a type of assassin-training program before they…

Researchers unravel mechanisms that control cell size

Dividing cells illustration. Credit: © Kateryna_Kon / Adobe Stock Working with bacteria, a multidisciplinary team at the University of California San Diego has provided new insight into a longstanding question in science: What are the underlying mechanisms that control the size of cells? Nearly five years ago a team led by Suckjoon Jun, a biophysicist…
dangerous-pathogens-use-this-sophisticated-machinery-to-infect-hosts

Dangerous pathogens use this sophisticated machinery to infect hosts

Pathogens illustration (stock image). Credit: © beawolf / Adobe Stock Gastric cancer, Q fever, Legionnaires' disease, whooping cough -- though the infectious bacteria that cause these dangerous diseases are each different, they all utilize the same molecular machinery to infect human cells. Bacteria use this machinery, called a Type IV secretion system (T4SS), to inject…

Researchers unravel mechanisms that control cell size

Dividing cells illustration. Credit: © Kateryna_Kon / Adobe Stock Working with bacteria, a multidisciplinary team at the University of California San Diego has provided new insight into a longstanding question in science: What are the underlying mechanisms that control the size of cells? Nearly five years ago a team led by Suckjoon Jun, a biophysicist…
owning-a-dog-is-influenced-by-our-genetic-make-up

Owning a dog is influenced by our genetic make-up

Woman and dog. Credit: © Vasyl / Adobe Stock A team of Swedish and British scientists have studied the heritability of dog ownership using information from 35,035 twin pairs from the Swedish Twin Registry. The new study suggests that genetic variation explains more than half of the variation in dog ownership, implying that the choice…
how-a-new-father-views-his-relationship-with-his-partner

How a new father views his relationship with his partner

Father, baby and mother. Credit: © Syda Productions / Adobe Stock A new father's views on his changing relationship with his wife or partner may depend in part on how much support he feels from her when he is caring for their baby, a new study suggests. Researchers found that a first-time father tended to…
neanderthals-and-modern-humans-diverged-at-least-800000-years-ago-research-on-teeth-shows

Neanderthals and modern humans diverged at least 800,000 years ago, research on teeth shows

Neanderthal vs human skull (stock image). Credit: © Bruder / Adobe Stock Neanderthals and modern humans diverged at least 800,000 years ago, substantially earlier than indicated by most DNA-based estimates, according to new research by a UCL academic. The research, published in Science Advances, analysed dental evolutionary rates across different hominin species, focusing on early…
how-a-member-of-a-family-of-light-sensitive-proteins-adjusts-skin-color

How a member of a family of light-sensitive proteins adjusts skin color

Skin colors concept. Credit: © luaeva / Adobe Stock A team of Brown University researchers found that opsin 3 -- a protein closely related to rhodopsin, the protein that enables low-light vision -- has a role in adjusting the amount of pigment produced in human skin, a determinant of skin color. When humans spend time…

Dangerous pathogens use this sophisticated machinery to infect hosts

Pathogens illustration (stock image). Credit: © beawolf / Adobe Stock Gastric cancer, Q fever, Legionnaires' disease, whooping cough -- though the infectious bacteria that cause these dangerous diseases are each different, they all utilize the same molecular machinery to infect human cells. Bacteria use this machinery, called a Type IV secretion system (T4SS), to inject…
ultra-clean-fabrication-platform-produces-nearly-ideal-2d-transistors

Ultra-clean fabrication platform produces nearly ideal 2D transistors

2D graphene illustration (stock image). Credit: © Ambelrip / Adobe Stock Semiconductors, which are the basic building blocks of transistors, microprocessors, lasers, and LEDs, have driven advances in computing, memory, communications, and lighting technologies since the mid-20th century. Recently discovered two-dimensional materials, which feature many superlative properties, have the potential to advance these technologies, but…
wearable-cooling-and-heating-patch-could-serve-as-personal-thermostat-and-save-energy

Wearable cooling and heating patch could serve as personal thermostat and save energy

Jacket (stock image). Credit: © Liaurinko / Adobe Stock Engineers at the University of California San Diego have developed a wearable patch that could provide personalized cooling and heating at home, work, or on the go. The soft, stretchy patch cools or warms a user's skin to a comfortable temperature and keeps it there as…
polymers-jump-through-hoops-on-pathway-to-sustainable-materials

Polymers jump through hoops on pathway to sustainable materials

Plastic recycling concept. Credit: © Andrey Popov / Adobe Stock Recyclable plastics that contain ring-shaped polymers may be a key to developing sustainable synthetic materials. Despite some promising advances, researchers said, a full understanding of how to processes ring polymers into practical materials remains elusive. In a new study, researchers identified a mechanism called "threading"…

Dangerous pathogens use this sophisticated machinery to infect hosts

Pathogens illustration (stock image). Credit: © beawolf / Adobe Stock Gastric cancer, Q fever, Legionnaires' disease, whooping cough -- though the infectious bacteria that cause these dangerous diseases are each different, they all utilize the same molecular machinery to infect human cells. Bacteria use this machinery, called a Type IV secretion system (T4SS), to inject…

Neanderthals and modern humans diverged at least 800,000 years ago, research on teeth shows

Neanderthal vs human skull (stock image). Credit: © Bruder / Adobe Stock Neanderthals and modern humans diverged at least 800,000 years ago, substantially earlier than indicated by most DNA-based estimates, according to new research by a UCL academic. The research, published in Science Advances, analysed dental evolutionary rates across different hominin species, focusing on early…

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